Blog Posts

Build Your Own Honeypot Network In Under An Hour

Have you ever wanted to control a vast medium small network of Honeypots but only had an hour and about $40 a month to spend on your project? So did I!  So with the help of Digital Ocean and Anomali‘s Modern Honey Network we can now do it!

For a basic distributed Cowrie network you will need:
1 – $20 a month Digital Ocean Droplet for the MHN Server.
4 – $5 a month Digital Ocean Droplets for the Cowrie honeypots.

Configuring The MHN Server:

Setting up the server is eas easy as running these commands on your controller droplet and and waiting 10 minutes:

sudo apt update
sudo apt upgrade -y
cd /opt/
sudo git clone https://github.com/threatstream/mhn.git
cd mhn/
sudo ./install.sh

After it installs everything it needs it will ask you the following questions:

Do you wish to run in Debug mode?: y/n n
Superuser email: jerry.gamblin@gmail.com
Superuser password:
Superuser password: (again):
Server base url ["http://honeypot.jgamblin.com"]:
Honeymap url [":3000"]: http://honeypot.jgamblin.com:3000
Mail server address ["localhost"]:
Mail server port [25]:
Use TLS for email?: y/n n
Use SSL for email?: y/n n
Mail server username [""]:
Mail server password [""]:
Mail default sender [""]:
Path for log file ["/var/log/mhn/mhn.log"]:
Would you like to integrate with Splunk? (y/n)n
Would you like to install ELK? (y/n)n

Once that is done you now have a working MHN server:

Configuring The HoneyPots:

At this time MHN supports 17 honeypots for easy deployment:

I have used cowrie in the past and like it a lot so decided to use it for this blog post. You can deploy cowrie honeypots to your MHN server with the following commands:

sudo apt update
sudo apt upgrade -y
sudo apt install python -y
wget "https://gist.githubusercontent.com/jgamblin/e2c5432fa4518876c0536b625f90f8da/raw/67f792b549198a9bff15fd863e4e0cca6ae50b37/cowrie.sh" -O deploy.sh && sudo bash deploy.sh http://yourmhnserver yourcode
#An update broke the deployment script and there is a proposed fix.
#I copied the proposed fix to the gist used here. 
#wget "http://yourmhnserver/api/script/?text=true&script_id=14" -O deploy.sh && sudo bash deploy.sh http://honeypot.jgamblin.com yourcode wget

This scripts moves your *real* ssh port to 2222 and starts the honeypot  on port 22 (SSH) and 23 (Telnet). 

Once the script is complete they show up in your MHN server:

Looking at the Data:

Within minutes you will have data to look at.  My honeypots were up for under 30 minutes and I had a lot of data:

Next Steps?

There are 16 other types of honeypots you can run. WordPot is an amazing WordPress Honeypot and Dionaea is a great way to capture your own malware samples.  I will likely run both and a few more as I keep playing with this project.

Have any questions? Reach out to me on twitter @jgamblin.

Anti-Vaxxers

In the last couple of years the Anti-Vaccination crowd in the United States has started to make inroads with more and more people deciding that the perceived risk of the vaccination outweighs the known risk of the disease.

When you ask them why they dont vaccinatie they always have anecdotal evidence of how the vaccination could hurt them,  how they know of someone else who 5 years ago got a vaccination and it made them *really sick*  or they have an amazing supplement that they take that does much better than the vaccination would do.


I am not talking about parents who are put their children at risk of getting measles, I am talking about IT shops who are putting their companies, customers and data at risk by not taking proven preventative measures to secure their systems.

After 15 years in security I have heard all the excuses for not vaccinating systems:

It *might* break something.
We have a $500,000 Next-Generation  ██████ Box (Unconfigured).
We have not a had a *serious* outbreak yet.

The problem is when you bring proven and tested solutions like the CIS Critical Security Controls and the anti-vaxxers bring an anecdote you are going to lose.  My favorite mentor told me a long time ago you “you can’t debate an anecdote and win“.

This is normally where I like to end my blog post with a great solution we can all use. The problem is there isn’t a good solution to make people vaccinate their children and there isn’t a solution to make  people to vaccinate their systems.

Until then I am just happy I dont have to deal with polio or WannaCry.

Finding and Mapping Domains With R

As I continue to try to learn R,  I am trying to build tools that other people might find useful. Tonight with the help of Bob Rudis I built a script that will find domains with a keyword in it from DomainPunch, do a geoip lookup and map it if it is online.

Since it is time to start thinking about defcon this summer I decided to use it as my keyword for the demo.

Here are all 544 live IPs with “defcon” in it mapped:

Link to the full screen map.
Here is a CSV of the data.

Here is the source code:

As a reminder if you want to play along at home there is an RStudio docker container so all you need to do is:

docker run -d -p 8787:8787 -e USER=<username> -e PASSWORD=<password> rocker/rstudio

Learning R is turning out to be more fun than I thought it would be so expect some more blog posts!  Here is a picture semi related to this blog post to make it look pretty when I share it on social media.  

Finding Additions To The Umbrella DNS Popularity List

Since I have started looking at the Umbrella DNS Popularity List I was interested in seeing how much the data changes day to day.  I fired up RStuido and wrote some terrible code but finally got it to work with some help.

Yesterday there were 80937 new DNS names on the list that were not on the list the day before.
(Update: Here is a CSV of the 169366 domains that were not on the list April 1st but was on the May 1st list.)

Here are the new additions on a map:

Link to the full screen map.

Here is a CSV of the data with GEOIP information added. 

Here is code I ended up with if you want to build your own:

Up next is to run these domains through Virustotal to see if any of them are bad.

Here is a picture semi related to this blog post to make it look pretty when I share it on social media. 

Big Data’ing The Umbrella DNS Popularity List

Recently I started looking at the Umbrella DNS Popularity List and did a blog post about it here. The data seemed valuable and lacking at the same time so I spent my *limited* free time this week learning about R and RStudio.

Protip:  If you want to play along at home there is an RStudio docker container so all you need to do is:

docker run -d -p 8787:8787 -e USER=<username> -e PASSWORD=<password> rocker/rstudio

Getting today’s list loaded into R is as simple as:

# Get Todays List
if (file.exists(fn)) file.remove(fn)
temp <- tempfile()
download.file("http://s3-us-west-1.amazonaws.com/umbrella-static/top-1m.csv.zip",temp)
unzip(temp, "top-1m.csv")
today <- read_csv("top-1m.csv", col_names = FALSE)
unlink(temp)

Now you have the Top 1 million DNS requests from Umbrella ready to be “big data’ed”.

At the start of this project I wanted to do the following:
Search the DNS names for keywords. (Done).
Map all the DNS records on a map. (Done, Kinda).
Compare today’s and yesterday’s records for new DNS records.
Check all the DNS records against Censys and record open ports, and software.
Check all the DNS records against VirusTotal and see if any of them are known bad.
Check all the DNS records against SSLLabs and record SSL grade.
Take a nap.

My limited results so far follow with hopefully more to come.

Search The DNS Names

I wanted to do this to be able to search the list for a keyword and build a table and map of the data.  This was fairly easy and with help of leaflet and datatables here is the output of searching today’s data for cisco.

Here is the map:

Here is a link to the data. 

Here is the R code I wrote:

Map All The DNS Records On A Map.

I got started on this and quickly realized that looking up the GEOIP information and mapping a million DNS records was going to take a week so I decided to do the Top 25,000 as a POC and come back and do all 1,000,000 later (maybe).

Here is the 25,000 Map:

Here is the R code I wrote:

I also built a map with the Top 100K on it but it is huge (Load at your own risk).

…More to come.

I will be spending some more time on this over the next couple of weeks but cant think @EngelhardtCR and @hrbrmstr enough for all the help they have been over the last week as.   They are true data scientist and I am just a hacker with a blog.  : )

If you have any questions or suggestions please let me know on twitter at @jgamblin.

Here is a picture semi related to this blog post to make it look pretty when I share it on social media. 

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